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End the madness dating jewish

As a result, on 13 Adar, five hundred attackers and Haman's ten sons are killed in Shushan.

When Mordecai finds out about the plans, he puts on sackcloth and ashes, a sign of mourning, publicly weeping and lamenting, and many other Jews in Shushan and other parts of Ahasuerus' empire do likewise, with widespread penitence and fasting.

Mordecai warns her that she will not be any safer in the palace than any other Jew, says that if she keeps silent, salvation for the Jews will arrive from some other quarter but "you and your father's house will perish," and suggests that she was elevated to the position of queen to be of help in just such an emergency.

Esther has a change of heart, says she will fast and pray for three days and will then approach the king to seek his help, despite the law against doing so, and "if I perish, I perish." She also requests that Mordecai tell all Jews of Shushan to fast and pray for three days together with her.

Esther discovers what has transpired; there follows an exchange of messages between her and Mordecai, with Hatach, one of the palace servants, as the intermediary.

Mordecai requests that she intercede with the king on behalf of the embattled Jews; she replies that nobody is allowed to approach the king, under penalty of death.

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  1. In 555 BCE, Samaria, the capital of the northern kingdom, fell to the Assyrians, and the Kingdom of Israel came to an end. The author convincingly resolves the discrepancy between the accurate dating from Jewish sources vs. how Greek history and astrological records were falsified to promote a more ancient date to.

  2. Many participants have attended Jewish singles weekends before, those organized both by SawYouAtSinai and by other organizations like End the Madness, a dating organization for Orthodox Jews; Gateways, which organizes Jewish educational retreats; and Flakey Jake, which offers weekends for the Modern Orthodox.

  3. May 22, 2013. Israel is a thriving and progressive Jewish democracy in many ways. So why does it allow Orthodox rabbis to maintain a stranglehold on marriage and divorce?

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